Chart Flashback: October 27, 1984

Prince had two Top 10 hits on the chart in October 1984.
Photo Credit
Richard E. Aaron/Redferns/Getty Images

Dateline: Oct. 27, 1984. Ozzy and Sharon Osbourne welcomed a daughter, Kelly; college footballer Reuben Mayes set an NCAA record for single-game rushing - and the Billboard Hot 100 was loaded with heavy hitters. Here's a rundown of this week's Top 10!

10. Rod Stewart, "Some Guys Have All the Luck"

Rod the Mod scored his eighth U.S. Top 10 with a song that was previously a minor hit for The Persuaders and Robert Palmer. It was the second Top 10 off his bestseller Camouflage, following the head-bopping "Infatuation."

Read More: November 1980: Rod Stewart Indulges 'Foolish Behaviour'

9. The Pointer Sisters, "I'm So Excited"

Second time's the charm: this feel-good single was a minor Top 40 hit for the Pointers two years earlier. When it was remixed and reissued to follow up the Top 5s "Automatic" and "Jump (for My Love)," it did even better, peaking here at No. 9. Ooo-wee!

Read More: July 1980: The Pointer Sisters Release "He's So Shy"

8. Prince and The Revolution, "Let's Go Crazy"

Purple Rain was one of the albums of 1984, of course, though here we catch the album's second single on its way down the Top 10 after topping the list for two weeks in September and early October. But it's not the last time we'll see Prince in this week's chart!

Read More: July 1984: Prince and The Revolution release "Let's Go Crazy"

7. John Cafferty and The Beaver Brown Band, "On the Dark Side"

Again, timing is everything: this single from the cult classic Eddie and The Cruisers missed the Top 40 after the film's abbreviated release in 1983. But more than a year later, video renters and cable watchers were starting to pick up on Eddie's story, and "On the Dark Side" finally got its due, peaking on the charts this week.

6. Wham! "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go"

Already a sensation in the U.K., George Michael and Andrew Ridgeley were about to take America by storm with their feel-good hits. In November, "Wake Me Up" would jitterbug to the top spot on the Hot 100, and "Careless Whisper" would follow in February 1985.

Read More: May 1984: Wham! Releases "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go"

5. Madonna, "Lucky Star"

The Queen of Pop was on her way to ruling the world in 1984, having turned heads just a month earlier with a star-making performance at the first MTV Video Music Awards. "Lucky Star" was Madonna's first Top 5, and a chart-topper was just weeks away with "Like a Virgin."

Read More: September 1984: Madonna Performs "Like a Virgin" At First VMAs

4. Prince and The Revolution, "Purple Rain"

One of Prince's singular masterpieces and the third Top 10 from the soundtrack to his film debut, "Purple Rain" was one of this week's biggest gainers, jumping from No. 9 on the Hot 100. It would peak at No. 2.

Read More: 5 Unforgettable Moments from Prince's Cult Classic Film, 'Purple Rain'

3. Chicago, "Hard Habit to Break"

Following the success of Chicago 16 in 1982, the Windy City rockers reunited with producer David Foster for Chicago 17, another set of soft-rock classics. "Hard Habit," featuring vocals from soon-to-go-solo Peter Cetera and session vocal king Bill Champlin, wouldn't peak past No. 3 - but follow-up "You're the Inspiration" was a No. 1 in waiting.

Read More: How Chicago the Band "Saved the Music"

2. Billy Ocean, "Caribbean Queen (No More Love on the Run)"

Amazing fact: all three of Billy Ocean's U.S. chart-toppers - this (a week away from reaching the top), "There'll Be Sad Songs (to Make You Cry)" and "Get Outta My Dreams, Get Into My Car" - all have eight-word titles! He's simply...awesome.

Read More: The #1 Song in America #OTD in 1984: Billy Ocean, "Caribbean Queen (No More Love on the Run)"

1. Stevie Wonder, "I Just Called to Say I Love You"

This calendar-spanning love note from the soundtrack to The Woman in Red spent its third and final week at No. 1 here - Stevie's eighth chart-topper.

Read More: September 1984: Stevie Wonder Scores His First UK No. 1 with "I Just Called to Say I Love You"

Read More

There was a time between 1984 and 1985 when Bryan Adams ruled the airwaves of the music world.

(A&M)
The hit song was based on a real-life incident.
Steve Hurrell/Redferns
Things get seriously merry in this, the first of a two-parter about Christmas.

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